Race, Religion, and Crime in the UK

According to a report on prison population statistics published by the Ministry of Justice, in 2013 blacks made up 13.2% of the prison population and 2.8% of the general population. Given that whites make up 88.3% of the total population but only 73.8% of the prison population, it follows that blacks are 5.6 times more likely to be incarcerated than whites. Similarly, in 2013 Muslims made up 13.1% of the prison population but just 4% of the general population meaning that they are 3.3 times more likely to be incarcerated than a member of the general population [1].

chart 9

Additional data from the Ministry of Justice’s latest report on race and crime indicates that in 2012 blacks were three times more likely to be arrested for a sexual offense than a member of the general population while whites were only 87% as likely to be arrested for a sexual offence than a member of the general population. Therefore blacks in the UK are 3.4 times more likely to be arrested for a sexual offence than a white person.

table 2

According to the report “In 2012, just under half of offenders sentenced to custody from the Black ethnic group for a sexual offence were sentenced for rape compared with just over a quarter of White offenders.” The report does not provide precise figures, but if we assume that “just under half” means 45% and that “just over a quarter” means 30% then this would mean if a black person and a white person were arrested for a sexual offence then the black person would be 50% more likely than the white person to have been arrested for sexual assault. Therefore, blacks in the UK are most likely arrested for sexual assault at a rate 5.1 times greater than whites. 

Another striking aspect of the arrest data is that in 2012 43.6% of all robbery arrests were of non-whites – the category of arrests where non-whites were most overrepresented [2].

race and arrests

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One thought on “Race, Religion, and Crime in the UK

  1. Pingback: Western Attitudes Towards Immigration | Psych and Society

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